Research

Shown The Exit: A Snapshot of the Issues Facing People Leaving Custody in NSW in 2016 – published in ‘Responding to Homelessness in NSW’ Parity Magazine, November, 2016.
– by Mindy Sotiri and Alex Faraguna (Community Restorative Centre)

In 2015/2016, 17,108 people were released from NSW prisons into the community.1 Sourcing suitable housing and accommodation options for people on release from custody is the single greatest challenge for community organisations working in the space of reintegration and transition. Although it is difficult to gauge the exact numbers of people on release who are exiting into homelessness, what is clear is that this population is significantly over-represented in prisons. Reception data indicates that as many as 60% of people in prison have come from primary or secondary homelessness.

Download and read the paper here.

 


Submission to the Proposed National Disability Insurance Scheme Quality and Safeguarding Framework (April 2015)
– by Simone Rowe, Sophie Russell, Mindy Sotiri (Community Restorative Centre)

With the introduction of the NDIS, at least in its current manifestation, the sustainability of CRCs existing services to people with intellectual and mental disabilities remains unclear. Furthermore, given their complex presentations, there is significant concern that people with intellectual and mental disabilities who are enmeshed in the criminal justice system will not fare well under the NDIS; rather, it appears likely that their incarceration rates will continue to escalate.

Download and read the paper here.

 


Homelessness in Ex-Prisoner Populations: A CRC Submission for FACS (2016)
– by Mindy Sotiri and Alex Faraguna (Community Restorative Centre)

Sourcing suitable housing and accommodation options for people on release from custody is the single greatest challenge for community organisations working in the space of reintegration and transition. Although it is difficult to gauge the exact numbers of people on release who are exiting into homelessness, what is clear is that this population is significantly over-represented in prisons. What is also clear is that not only does the experience of homelessness significantly increase the risk of imprisonment (and other forms of adverse criminal justice system contact), imprisonment itself increases the likelihood of homelessness.

Download and read the paper here.

 


An Exploration of Best Practice in Community Based Reintegration Programs for People Leaving Custody in the US and the UK.
– Dr Mindy Sotiri (Community Restorative Centre)

This project is an exploration of best practice in community-based reintegration services for people leaving prison; it has a particular focus on issues related to working with complex needs populations. Complex needs populations include people with cognitive impairment, mental illness, long histories of criminal justice system involvement, homelessness, and limited community connection and engagement. This research included an extensive literature review, hundreds of e-mail and phone conversations with experts around the world, and 26 direct service visits to community based programs in Chicago, Detroit, Washington, Providence, New York, London and Glasgow.

Download and read the paper here.

You can read more on The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust website.

 


Supporting people with Cognitive Impairment and criminal justice system involvement: A briefing paper overviewing key challenges and service gaps.
– Alison Churchill, Mindy Sotiri and Simone Rowe (Community Restorative Centre)

This paper highlights some of the major outstanding challenges for people with intellectual disability, complex needs and offending behaviour transitioning to the NDIS.

The Community Restorative Centre’s (CRC) concerns can be summarised as follows:

  1. The separation of disability and non-disability related behaviours under the NDIS framework (and the un-met need for holistic support for complex needs clients);
  2. The complicated implications of the ‘choice and control’ policy framework of NDIS in relation to this population group;
  3. The implications of the fee-for-service model in terms of ‘cherry-picking’ clients in order to ensure organisational financial sustainability (why clients with rapidly changing complex support needs won’t be supported);
  4. The need to appropriately consider the risks posed to the community if this group are not adequately supported (and the poor access to services in the community for this group);
  5. The importance of understanding the full effects of incarceration on individuals with intellectual disability and complex needs;
  6. The implications of excluding prisons in NDIS pilot sites (which means there is no possibility of implementing internationally recognised best practice through-care models of support)

Download and read the paper here.